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As a signatory to the Indigenous Art Code we are focused on ensuring ethical standards are in place when we source Indigenous products and that we respect Indigenous cultural practices and Artists’ rights.

Ready to Hang Aboriginal Art - Wardapi Jukurrpa 30 x 30cm

Australian Made

6575/22

Artist: Tanya Napangardi Wheeler

Artwork:

Size: 30cm x 30cm

Acrylic Canvas: A ready to hang artwork.

View Artwork In: Balmain East shop

The painting is accompanied by a signed and dated Certificate of Authenticity which tells the story related to the painting and some information about the artist.

Sale of this artwork directly benefits the Artist and the.

Buy Aboriginal art that is ready to hang.

The 30cm x 30cm canvas is an authentic Indigenous artwork from Central Australia and has been stretched and is ready to hang on your wall.

Artwork Description

This painting depicts a ‘wardapi Jukurrpa’ (sand monitor/goanna [Varanus gouldii] Dreaming). This dramatic Jukurrpa travels between Purturlu (Mount Theo), approximately 150kms north-northwest of Yuendumu, and Yarripilangu (Newhaven), which is approximately 100kms southwest of Yuendumu. This painting focuses on the portion of the Jukurrpa that takes place at Yarripilangu, which is owned by Napaljarri/Nungarrayi women and Japaljarri/Jungarrayi men. The portion of the Jukurrpa at Purturlu belongs to Napanangka/Napangardi women and Japanangka/Japangardi men.

This Jukurrpa tells the story of a Japangardi man named Wamaru who lived at Jarrardajarrayi, an area of country near Purturlu. This Japangardi man lived at Jarrardajarrayi near a soakage called Juntangkalpa. He travelled south to Yarripilangu and approached a group of ‘karnta’ (women) that were sitting down in a circle there. He wanted to woo a Nungarrayi woman named Yurlkurinyi who was the wrong skin for him. By tribal law, this woman was his mother-in-law and their relationship would be taboo.

The Japangardi man wooed the Nungarrayi woman and they went up the hill at Yarripilangu where they made love. The earth there turned to ‘ngunjungunju’ (white ochre) and the man turned himself and all the ‘karnta’ (women) into ‘wardapi’ (goannas). The Japangardi man eventually brought the Nungarrayi woman back to Purturlu to live, even though they were the wrong skin for each other.

White ochre is still found on top of the hill at Yarripilangu and is used today for love magic and for ceremonial decoration. There’s also a cave where you can see the shape of a goanna entering. There are beautiful groundwater springs on the east side of the Yarripilangu hill. A number of important Jukurrpa associated with mens’ initiation ceremonies pass through Yarripilangu; these include ‘karnta Jukurrpa’ (womens’ Dreaming), ‘ngalyipi Jukurrpa’ (snakevine [Tinospora smilacina] Dreaming), ‘wati-jarra Jukurrpa’ (two men Dreaming), and ‘witi Jukurrpa’ (ceremonial pole Dreaming).

In contemporary Warlpiri paintings, traditional iconography can be used to represent the Jukurrpa, particular sites, and other elements. In paintings of this Jukurrpa, the group of women is often represented by concentric circles and ‘U’ shapes. Concentric circles can also illustrate ‘wardapi’ holes and the droppings they leave, while ‘wardapi’ tracks are usually represented by ‘W’ shapes.

This pre-stretched original Aboriginal artwork makes a unique Australian gift for birthdays, Christmas, weddings and other special occasions.

This original Aboriginal artwork is from the Warlukurlangu Art Centre. Established in 1985 Warlukurlangu is a not-for-profit organisation that is 100% Aboriginal-owned by its artists from the remote desert communities of Yuendumu and Nyirripi in Central Australia.

Warlukurlangu Artists is famous for its gloriously colourful acrylic paintings. The art centre has a national and international profile and its art has been featured in hundreds of exhibitions and publications in Australia and around the world.

This original Aboriginal artwork is from the Warlukurlangu Art Centre. Established in 1985 Warlukurlangu is a not-for-profit organisation that is 100% Aboriginal-owned by its artists from the remote desert communities of Yuendumu and Nyirripi in Central Australia.

Warlukurlangu Artists is famous for its gloriously colourful acrylic paintings. The art centre has a national and international profile and its art has been featured in hundreds of exhibitions and publications in Australia and around the world.